Water Lilies Painted by Claude Monet

Water lilies painted by Claude Monet made in 1905, is one of a group of water-lily subjects. The beauty of his work tends to be more attractive, as compared to traditional landscape painting. Both kind of paintings have common theme of “nature” and having of their work outdoor.

Traditional landscape compositions usually consist of perspective and the horizon from afar; the dramatic clouds above, and the land with people, housing, mountains, etc. The artwork is easily understood and to appreciate, as within one’s eye-level who tend to see distant objects in a panoramic aspects.

In Monet’s water lilies, he has a different approach to landscaping. In 1895 he began to paint waterscapes, a practice he continued until his death. After the completion of the Japanese Bridge series (1899 – 1901) he enlarged the pond, using it for both the series of water lilies made between 1903 and 1908, and for his later ‘decorations’, on which he devoted the closing years of his life.

His work on water lilies has abandoned any reference to the banks of the pond, concentrating instead on the water and plants. The surfaces of the painting and of the pool merge into one. The top of the composition bulges with lilies, while the water reads as both an illusion of depth and a reflection of nearby trees and distant sky.

The effect is to invert the composition, and in doing so Monet has overturned the tradition expectation of landscape painting, namely the inclusion of the horizon line and perspective. When forty-eight of these works were shown at Durand-Ruel in 1999, guests enjoyed a favorable critical reception, with analogies being drawn between the paintings and music and poetry.

Water Lilies, Monet's
Water Lilies, Monet’s
Water-Lilies, Sunset
Water-Lilies, Sunset
Water Lilies, Morning
Water Lilies, Morning